Industry groups Quotes

I am here today to address the proposition that two provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005--that being section 327 concerning hydraulic fracturing, and section 328 regarding stormwater--have resulted in harm to drinking water resources in the United States. The evidence would strongly suggest otherwise. These two provisions simply removed unnecessary administrative burdens on the production of oil and natural gas in the United States.

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David E. Bolin, deputy director of the State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives.

The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Underground Injection Control (UIC) program is intended to manage the disposition of wastes into geologic repositories. Hydraulic fracturing is a well stimulation technology that has been used for more than 50 years over a million times. It has been regulated for decades by states and never posed an environmental risk. It is essential to the development of American natural gas and oil. There are no environmental benefits to additional federal regulation.

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Independent Petroleum Association of America, Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives.

Testimony submitted to this hearing by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) proposes a series of changes to federal environmental law that taken together can only serve to cripple American oil and natural gas production without attendant environmental benefits....The Committee – and more broadly the Congress – should summarily reject NRDC’s proposals. They follow the tired path of alleging to the Congress the need to change laws and regulations that do not follow NRDC’s world view and where NRDC and its allied professional anti-development organizations have failed to change the regulatory program through the normal processes or by appealing to the court system. This collection of proposals will have one clear effect – less exploration and production of American oil and natural gas and more foreign dependency. This is hardly an energy policy that makes sense of America.

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Independent Petroleum Association of America , Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives.

By paying workers who take extended time off from the job for almost any sort of family concern, this mandate would impose significant costs in the form of payments for replacement workers, including overtime. It would disrupt work schedules and leave difficult gaps in staffing for small and large companies…It's already hard enough to do business and provide jobs in New York state. Our leaders in Albany should not make it still harder.

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Kenneth Adams, President and CEO of The Business Council of New York State, Syracuse’s The Post-Standard.

This socialist diktat takes feel-good politics to a new level….the basic argument for this socialist propaganda is the necessity for Big Brother to subsidize an army of breastfeeding single mothers….Ultimately, the inevitable impact of the cost of the paid family leave measure will fall on the shoulders of the ever-diminishing minority in this state: those who build businesses and create the real jobs that sustain our economy. You know, the ones moving to Florida and other states with no state income tax and few of the ridiculous government regulations that make New Jersey the worst state in the nation for small business.

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Steven Lonegan, Republican mayor of Bogota and executive director of Americans for Prosperity, The Bergen County Record

I’m scared that this provision will add a pretty significant cost. You’re going to see a lot of small guys just close up shop.

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Bill K. Caylor, president of the Kentucky Coal association. International Herald Tribune.

Most businesses would tell you that they presently take care of their employees. They don't need government telling them how to do it.

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Gary Chandler, vice president for governmental affairs at the Association of Washington Business. The Associated Press State & Local Wire.

We want to take the message to the public and the San Francisco residents to let them know how close to the tipping point the restaurant industry is.

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Kevin Westlye, executive director of the Golden Gate Restaurant Association. San Francisco Chronicle

I’m going to have to raise prices for all my drinks and appetizers a dollar and entrees two dollars. I don’t know how else to do it. We are known as the best restaurant city in the world, but we are going to start lagging because there will be a lack of service, a lack of staff in the dining hall. Something has to give.

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Dave Stanton, managing partner of Tres Agaves a the Mexican restaurant near AT&T Park. The San Francisco Chronicle.

I can tell you that as of right now, we are not looking to expand in San Francisco. It’s a labor-intensive industry, and the last thing we need is to get dinged for it.

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Eric Rubin, a managing partner in the restaurant Tres Agaves, The San Francisco Chronicle.

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