Oil, Coal, and Gas Regulations Quotes

...we are not supportive of the extensive, prescriptive regulations as proposed in this rule. We believe industry's current safety and environmental statistics demonstrate that the voluntary programs implemented since the adoption of API RP 75 have been and continue to be very successful.

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British Petroleum’s public comment letter to the Mineral Management Service and the Department of the Interior. The New York Times.

The proposed rule prescribes stricter requirements than the approach on which it is based (API Recommended Practice 75, Development of a Safety and Environmental Management Program for Offshore Operations and Facilities, or SEMP), and may generate significant difficulties for operators and contractors to abide by the rule.

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ExxonMobil Production’s public comment letter to the Mineral Management Service and the Department of the Interior. The New York Times.

This proposed action is a major, paper work intensive, rulemaking that will significantly impact our business, both operationally and financially, and will bring little or no benefit towards improving safety of offshore operations. In addition to the unnecessary burden to industry, it will create an additional unwarranted burden to regional MMS staff that will require additional inspector/auditor training and increased workload demand.

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Enterprise Field Services public comment letter to the Mineral Management Service and the Department of the Interior. The New York Times.

Elimination of sections 327 and 328 [of the Safe Water Drinking Act] would not make production of oil and natural gas in the United States any safer, but could substantially increase domestic oil and natural gas production costs, thereby decreasing domestic supply.

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David E. Bolin, deputy director of the State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives.

I am here today to address the proposition that two provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005--that being section 327 concerning hydraulic fracturing, and section 328 regarding stormwater--have resulted in harm to drinking water resources in the United States. The evidence would strongly suggest otherwise. These two provisions simply removed unnecessary administrative burdens on the production of oil and natural gas in the United States.

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David E. Bolin, deputy director of the State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives.

The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Underground Injection Control (UIC) program is intended to manage the disposition of wastes into geologic repositories. Hydraulic fracturing is a well stimulation technology that has been used for more than 50 years over a million times. It has been regulated for decades by states and never posed an environmental risk. It is essential to the development of American natural gas and oil. There are no environmental benefits to additional federal regulation.

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Independent Petroleum Association of America, Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives.

Testimony submitted to this hearing by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) proposes a series of changes to federal environmental law that taken together can only serve to cripple American oil and natural gas production without attendant environmental benefits....The Committee – and more broadly the Congress – should summarily reject NRDC’s proposals. They follow the tired path of alleging to the Congress the need to change laws and regulations that do not follow NRDC’s world view and where NRDC and its allied professional anti-development organizations have failed to change the regulatory program through the normal processes or by appealing to the court system. This collection of proposals will have one clear effect – less exploration and production of American oil and natural gas and more foreign dependency. This is hardly an energy policy that makes sense of America.

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Independent Petroleum Association of America , Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives.

These regulations, taken in combination with other pending requirements, will have serious affects on the petroleum industry, the economy, and the nation--reducing investment in capacity and new technologies, making domestic refiners less competitive in the global marketplace, increasing imports of refined products by up to 500,000 barrels per day, increasing consumer prices for products such as gasoline and heating oil, and reducing industry employment.

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American Petroleum Institute.

The other thing that I want to mention by way of example, which is-which will, I am sure, be discussed by others in the industry, is the expansion of the Toxic Release Inventory to cover the oil and gas exploration in the production industry. The IOGCC has been opposed to this and has a committee working specifically to change the minds of the Environmental Protection Agency to do this unnecessary expansion. Not only would it unnecessarily expand the toxic release inventory to an industry that is not appropriate but it would dilute the whole good part of what the toxic release inventory is doing for the States.

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Christine Hansen, representing the Board, the State of Alabama, and other member States of the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, Testimony, U.S. House Committee on Government Oversight and Reform.

If the Coast Guard implements a regulation requiring the certificates, but if there are no insurers willing to back them, then there is the possibility that all tankers would be banned from US waters.

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The International Association of Independent Tanker Owners (Intertanko), Greenwire.

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