Ergonomics Standard (2000)

Ergonomics Standard (2000)

The ergonomics standard issued by OSHA in 2000 would have required hazard information and reporting, training, and worker participation programs, among other elements. It would have covered more than 6 million employers and 102 million workers. OSHA estimated the standard would have prevented at least 4.6 million ergonomics-related injuries (musculoskeletal injuries are responsible for one-third of reported work-related injuries and illnesses). The standard was repealed in 2001 by George W. Bush and the Republican Congress.

Cry Wolf Quotes

Repealing the ergonomics regulation will save small businesses billions of dollars that means fewer layoffs, less pay-cuts and economic growth.

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Rep. Henry Bonilla (R-TX), The New York Times, “House Joins Senate in Repealing Rules on Workplace Injuries”.

If implemented, they would require employers to establish burdensome and costly new systems intended to track, prevent and provide compensation for an extremely broad class of injuries whose cause is subject to considerable dispute.

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The Bush Administration, The Los Angeles Times, “Senate Overturns Ergonomics Rules on Worker Safety”.

This fight's not over… The best-intentioned employer isn't going to be able to figure out [the standards], even if he has hundreds of lawyers. It's like getting your arms around a bowl of Jell-O.

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Randy Johnson, a vice president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, The Los Angeles Times.

These [ergonomics] regulations would cost employers, large and small, billions of dollars annually while providing uncertain benefits.

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White House budget office, under the Bush administration. Wall Street Journal.