Ergonomics Standard (2000)

Ergonomics Standard (2000)

The ergonomics standard issued by OSHA in 2000 would have required hazard information and reporting, training, and worker participation programs, among other elements. It would have covered more than 6 million employers and 102 million workers. OSHA estimated the standard would have prevented at least 4.6 million ergonomics-related injuries (musculoskeletal injuries are responsible for one-third of reported work-related injuries and illnesses). The standard was repealed in 2001 by George W. Bush and the Republican Congress.

Cry Wolf Quotes

LPA is pleased to submit testimony in strong opposition to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) proposed ergonomics standard, and in particular, the work restriction protection provisions, which would effectively replace state workers' compensation laws for injured employees. As estimated by the Employment Policy Foundation, at $100 billion, the standard is likely the most costly in OSHA's history…

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Congressional testimony of LPA representative, before the Senate Labor Committee Subcommittee on Employment, Safety and Training.

If implemented, they would require employers to establish burdensome and costly new systems intended to track, prevent and provide compensation for an extremely broad class of injuries whose cause is subject to considerable dispute.

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The Bush Administration, The Los Angeles Times, “Senate Overturns Ergonomics Rules on Worker Safety”.

[The ergonomics standard is] the most expensive, intrusive regulations ever promulgated, certainly by the Department of Labor and maybe by any department in history.

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Sen. Don Nickles (R-Okla.) assistant majority leader. The Los Angeles Times.

[The ergonomics standard is a] overbroad, overdrawn, bureaucratic mess.

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Sen. Mike Enzi (R., Wyo.), From Wall St. Journal.