Equal Pay Act Quotes

Millions of women will get pay raises over the next years, but countless others are in danger of losing their jobs.

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From an article in U.S. News and World Report entitled “When Women Get Paid as Much as Men”.
360306/03/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

[While the] bill may have motives in the finest traditions of gallantry, it actually is about as ungallant as a kick in the shins. [These costs arise] from the indisputable fact that women are more prone to housemaking and motherhood than men.

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[Representative Paul] Findley [R-IL), The Chicago Tribune.
360205/05/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

To have any meaning at all, a comparison of wage rates must be based on the wages of employees doing at least the same kind of work. For example, if one includes the wages of both skilled and unskilled employees in determining the average rates for women and men, the sex having the greater number of skilled workers will obviously have the higher average wage rate. There are, of course, a greater number of skilled male employees than skilled female employees. Consequently, when average wage rates are compared without being limited to the type of work being performed, the comparison is not merely meaningless; it is totally misleading. The resultant differential between the average wage rates of women and men simply cannot properly be used to support an argument that Federal equal pay legislation is necessary.

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W. Boyd Owen, Vice-president of personnel administration for the Owens-Illinois Glass Company, Testimony, Senate Hearing.
359904/03/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

The broadly and vaguely worded administrative and enforcement provisions of [the bill] would authorize extensive governmental intervention in labor-management relations far exceeding the purported evils at which this legislation is allegedly directed. Such provisions, moreover, effectively give the Secretary and his agents an unlimited license to destroy the wage structures which both management and labor have worked for years to develop….The exercise of such unlimited powers could not but grievously and irreparably injure labor management relations throughout the Nation.

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W. Boyd Owen, Vice-president of personnel administration for the Owens-Illinois Glass Company, Testimony, Senate Hearing.
360004/03/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

The enactment of any equal pay legislation will add hundreds of employees to an already inflated Federal payroll and hundreds of thousands of dollars to an already astronomical Federal budget.

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W. Boyd Owen, Vice-president of personnel administration for the Owens-Illinois Glass Company, Testimony, Senate Hearing.
360104/03/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

[T]he inevitable effect of this legislation will be to create an artificial barrier on job opportunities for women. There will be a strong compulsion on employers to divide their jobs into women’s jobs and men’s jobs and to never hire a person of the opposite sex in those jobs just so they will not have the Department of Labor looking over their shoulders.

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William Miller representative of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Testimony, House Hearing.
359804/02/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

If my company were compelled to raise all of our female rates in this plant to the male rates in question, it would seriously jeopardize the competitive position of this plant with its competitors located in other states employing all females in these jobs.

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Jerry N. Markham, director of industrial relations, Thatcher Glass Manufacturing Company, Testimony, House Hearing.
359603/27/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

[Consider] the possible impact of this bill upon efforts to equalize wages in plants employing mostly women and relatively few men. If there is a wage differential between men and women that cannot be justified under the restrictive standards of this bill and the wages of the male employees cannot be reduced, a plant could run into serious financial difficulty if it were forced to increase the pay of all female employees to the level of the few male members.

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John B. Olverson representing the Electronic Industries Association, Testimony, House Hearing.
359703/27/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

Members of the Council of State Chambers of Commerce do not argue with the principal of equal pay for equal work. However, they have consistently advocated and endorsed a policy of home rule. State legislation on such subjects is preferred to Federal legislation whenever practical. Twenty-two States have enacted equal pay bills. This in itself…indicates that States can adequately cover this subject, and no need exists for additional Federal legislation.

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James E. Fagan, speaking on behalf of the Council of State Chambers of Commerce, Testimony, House Hearing.
359503/26/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

We have had several young men start out as secretaries and later rise to positions of importance. …When these young men started, and as they progressed, I am certain that their wages were higher than some female secretaries doing equal or superior work. But we also knew that there was a possible potential of their rising to more important jobs, supervising a large number of men. If this law is passed, we will hire women for all secretarial positions and be deprived of this avenue of advancement.

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William Miller representative of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Testimony, House Hearing.
359203/26/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

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