Bad for business

Bad for business

Commentary

Living Wage has brought good competition to Los Angeles International Airport

L.A.'s Living Wage Ordinance Isn't a Job Killer

September 21, 2011

The Great Regulation Charade

September 20, 2011

Cry Wolf Quotes

[I]t is conceivable that this trade secret data would be considered so valuable that a company would elect not to do business in Philadelphia rather than disclose it and so I have detailed our concerns on the issue of confidentiality.

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Robert P. Vogel of Rohm and Haas Chemical Company

Testimony submitted to this hearing by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) proposes a series of changes to federal environmental law that taken together can only serve to cripple American oil and natural gas production without attendant environmental benefits....The Committee – and more broadly the Congress – should summarily reject NRDC’s proposals. They follow the tired path of alleging to the Congress the need to change laws and regulations that do not follow NRDC’s world view and where NRDC and its allied professional anti-development organizations have failed to change the regulatory program through the normal processes or by appealing to the court system. This collection of proposals will have one clear effect – less exploration and production of American oil and natural gas and more foreign dependency. This is hardly an energy policy that makes sense of America.

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Independent Petroleum Association of America , Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives.

The imposition of large cost burdens on the private sector [rests] ultimately on the U.S. economy. [Additionally there are] many less visible secondary effects that cause substantial incremental costs…to society generally. [These include] losses in productivity of labor, equipment, and capital, delays in construction of new plants and equipment, misallocation of resources and lost opportunities.

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From the “The Cost of Government Regulation": a study for the Business Roundtable by Arthur Anderson & Co.

We would strenuously object to any bill that would make it unlawful to allow water from the anthracite mines or breakers to enter the streams adjacent thereto because, as stated herein, they do not adversely affect the streams and there is no other place where these waters can go…..The anthracite industry would be put out of business overnight if such laws were passed and enforced and it would still leave the problem unsolved. If no new source of pollution (especially acid mine water) is permitted, as proposed in H. R. 123, except with final approval of the Surgeon General, it may eventually prevent the opening of new mines, whose mineral products might be sorely needed in our economy, especially in being ready to secure our Nation in its problems of defense.

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Henry H. Otto, Assistant General Manager, The Hudson Coal Co., Scranton, PA on behalf of the Anthracite Institute of Wilkes-Barre, PA., Testimony, House Committee on Public Works.