National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) Quotes

S. 1795 could extend the authority of government into a takeover of the functions of the marketplace. What the American public wants to buy, and at what price, would no longer be the guideline for American business. Instead, the manufacturer and the businessman would have to look first to Washington, rather than to the consumer.

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Speech of Richard Kautz, Chairman of NAM, Wichita Luncheon, Papers of the National Association of Manufacturers.

I assure you, Senator Javits and others are dead serious in this frontal assault against our free enterprise system. Make no mistake about it, we are talking survival.

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Speech of Richard Kautz, Chairman of NAM, Wichita Luncheon, Papers of the National Association of Manufacturers.

The danger is from those who believe that government should be the source of all economic hope for the individual. The danger is from those who believe that government planning is a better device than the free marketplace for distribution of goods and distribution of the nation’s wealth.

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Speech of Richard Kautz, Chairman of NAM, Wichita Luncheon, Papers of the National Association of Manufacturers.

This bill could affect the business of every executive in this room. It could affect the entire national economy and the private lives of every American citizen.

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Speech of Richard Kautz, Chairman of NAM, Wichita Luncheon, Papers of the National Association of Manufacturers.

We feel that the new plant should have equipment installed to abate pollution that meets and exceeds the established standards. If I recognize what you are driving at, company XYZ could come out with a piece of equipment that could be extremely expensive that would eliminate all pollution whatsoever and if I were to agree with your question, that would mean that all of your industry would then have to buy that piece of equipment from company XYZ with the basis against all other companies that are producing pollution equipment. I don’t think that is the objective of free enterprise.

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Donald R. Talbot, The National Association of Manufacturers, Testimony, Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution of the Senate Committee on Public Works
04/20/1970 | Full Details | Law(s): Clean Water Act

Centralized control could not take into account the wildly divergent conditions, hazards, processes, and environmental problems which may be peculiar to a given industry or given geographic area.

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Paul R. Hafer, National Association of Manufacturers, Testimony, Senate Subcommittee on Labor and Public Welfare.

Under the proposed bill, industry is held guilty until proven innocent.

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Paul R. Hafer, National Association of Manufacturers, Testimony, Senate Subcommittee on Labor and Public Welfare.

[T]he human factor is one of the most important causal elements involved in any accidental occurrence. It is estimated that 75 percent or more of all injuries from accidents result from a negligent or unsafe act on the part of the individual involved….The development of positive safety attitudes and safety effectiveness on the part of each individual employee is the most direct approach to the reduction of industrial accidents.

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Paul R. Hafer, National Association of Manufacturers, Testimony, Senate Subcommittee on Labor and Public Welfare.

Each employee must be motivated through training, education, by supervision to understand and to want to perform work safely. This desire must come from within—it cannot be imposed through the threat of civil or criminal sanctions against the employer. NAM believes that…the Secretary of Labor should not be given such unprecedented powers as proposed in this bill.

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Paul R. Hafer, National Association of Manufacturers, Testimony, Senate Subcommittee on Labor and Public Welfare.

The human factor is the most important cause of accidents and injuries. It has been estimated that 75 to 85 percent of all such occurrences have been caused by a negligent or unsafe act on the part of an individual...This cannot be [fixed] through legislation.

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National Association of Manufacturers’ (NAM) representative Raymond M. Lyons. Testimony, House Select Subcommittee on Labor.

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