Oil, Coal, and Gas Regulations

Oil, Coal, and Gas Regulations

Oil, gas, and coal are three of the most widely used energy sources in America. Unfortunately, all three take a terrible toll on human populations and the environment, both during the extraction process and use. Government agencies including the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitor and regulate these economic sectors, and numerous laws have been passed to address the negative externalities created by these industries.

Commentary

PG&E’s success in Washington led to failure in San Bruno

August 31, 2011
Claims of EPA "train wreck" derailed

Claims of EPA "Train Wreck" Derailed

August 26, 2011
Clean Fuels Standard

Northeast Clean Fuels Standard = Thousands of Jobs, Billions of Dollars

August 16, 2011

Cry Wolf Quotes

These regulations, taken in combination with other pending requirements, will have serious affects on the petroleum industry, the economy, and the nation--reducing investment in capacity and new technologies, making domestic refiners less competitive in the global marketplace, increasing imports of refined products by up to 500,000 barrels per day, increasing consumer prices for products such as gasoline and heating oil, and reducing industry employment.

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American Petroleum Institute.

I am here today to address the proposition that two provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005--that being section 327 concerning hydraulic fracturing, and section 328 regarding stormwater--have resulted in harm to drinking water resources in the United States. The evidence would strongly suggest otherwise. These two provisions simply removed unnecessary administrative burdens on the production of oil and natural gas in the United States.

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David E. Bolin, deputy director of the State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives.

The net result could well be a greater probability of oil spills, less likelihood of a responsible owner to deal with those spills, less reliable transportation of oil and greater cost to the consumer; the very things the U.S. wanted to avoid.

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Vernon C. Miller Jr., Vice President of Greenwich, Conn.-based Skaarup Shipping Corp. The Journal of Commerce.

...we are not supportive of the extensive, prescriptive regulations as proposed in this rule. We believe industry's current safety and environmental statistics demonstrate that the voluntary programs implemented since the adoption of API RP 75 have been and continue to be very successful.

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British Petroleum’s public comment letter to the Mineral Management Service and the Department of the Interior. The New York Times.