Oil, Coal, and Gas Regulations

Oil, Coal, and Gas Regulations

Oil, gas, and coal are three of the most widely used energy sources in America. Unfortunately, all three take a terrible toll on human populations and the environment, both during the extraction process and use. Government agencies including the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitor and regulate these economic sectors, and numerous laws have been passed to address the negative externalities created by these industries.

Commentary

PG&E’s success in Washington led to failure in San Bruno

August 31, 2011
Claims of EPA "train wreck" derailed

Claims of EPA "Train Wreck" Derailed

August 26, 2011
Clean Fuels Standard

Northeast Clean Fuels Standard = Thousands of Jobs, Billions of Dollars

August 16, 2011

Cry Wolf Quotes

The net result could well be a greater probability of oil spills, less likelihood of a responsible owner to deal with those spills, less reliable transportation of oil and greater cost to the consumer; the very things the U.S. wanted to avoid.

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Vernon C. Miller Jr., Vice President of Greenwich, Conn.-based Skaarup Shipping Corp. The Journal of Commerce.

The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Underground Injection Control (UIC) program is intended to manage the disposition of wastes into geologic repositories. Hydraulic fracturing is a well stimulation technology that has been used for more than 50 years over a million times. It has been regulated for decades by states and never posed an environmental risk. It is essential to the development of American natural gas and oil. There are no environmental benefits to additional federal regulation.

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Independent Petroleum Association of America, Testimony, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives.

These regulations, taken in combination with other pending requirements, will have serious affects on the petroleum industry, the economy, and the nation--reducing investment in capacity and new technologies, making domestic refiners less competitive in the global marketplace, increasing imports of refined products by up to 500,000 barrels per day, increasing consumer prices for products such as gasoline and heating oil, and reducing industry employment.

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American Petroleum Institute.

OPA 90 -- virtually everyone affected, except the environmentalists, think it is as the 'Rocky Horror Picture Show.' Congress crafted it in an emotional bonfire, which was ignited by the massive spill at Valdez.

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Joe Farrell, president of the American Waterways Operators, United Press International.