Oil, Coal, and Gas Regulations

Oil, Coal, and Gas Regulations

Oil, gas, and coal are three of the most widely used energy sources in America. Unfortunately, all three take a terrible toll on human populations and the environment, both during the extraction process and use. Government agencies including the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitor and regulate these economic sectors, and numerous laws have been passed to address the negative externalities created by these industries.

Commentary

PG&E’s success in Washington led to failure in San Bruno

August 31, 2011
Claims of EPA "train wreck" derailed

Claims of EPA "Train Wreck" Derailed

August 26, 2011
Clean Fuels Standard

Northeast Clean Fuels Standard = Thousands of Jobs, Billions of Dollars

August 16, 2011

Cry Wolf Quotes

...we are not supportive of the extensive, prescriptive regulations as proposed in this rule. We believe industry's current safety and environmental statistics demonstrate that the voluntary programs implemented since the adoption of API RP 75 have been and continue to be very successful.

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British Petroleum’s public comment letter to the Mineral Management Service and the Department of the Interior. The New York Times.

The fallout from the act is coming. It is like the sword of Damocles hanging over the industry.

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Ernest Corrado, President of the American Institute of Merchant Shipping. The Journal of Commerce.

These regulations, taken in combination with other pending requirements, will have serious affects on the petroleum industry, the economy, and the nation--reducing investment in capacity and new technologies, making domestic refiners less competitive in the global marketplace, increasing imports of refined products by up to 500,000 barrels per day, increasing consumer prices for products such as gasoline and heating oil, and reducing industry employment.

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American Petroleum Institute.

This proposed action is a major, paper work intensive, rulemaking that will significantly impact our business, both operationally and financially, and will bring little or no benefit towards improving safety of offshore operations. In addition to the unnecessary burden to industry, it will create an additional unwarranted burden to regional MMS staff that will require additional inspector/auditor training and increased workload demand.

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Enterprise Field Services public comment letter to the Mineral Management Service and the Department of the Interior. The New York Times.