Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, also called the Deficit Reduction Act, modestly raised taxes and succeeded in wiping out the federal budget deficit for the first time in decades.

The bill added two higher taxes brackets: individual income tax rates of 36 percent and 39.6 (previously 31 percent had been the highest bracket). The bill included a 35 percent income tax rate for corporations and 4.3 cents per gallon increase in transportation fuels taxes.

Cry Wolf Quotes

About the only positive environmental impact this tax package will produce is that in destroying 400,000 American jobs, there will be fewer commuters driving their cars to work each day! Between the Clean Air Act and this proposed tax, this country will lose almost 20 percent of its refinery capacity by the end of the decade. In addition to the refinery problem, the tax is punitive to clean fuels, providing little incentives for industries to switch to more environmentally sound fuels like natural gas.”

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Jack Fields (R-TX), Congressional Record

These new taxes will stifle economic growth, destroy jobs, reduce revenues, and increase the deficit. Economists across the ideological spectrum are convinced that the Clinton tax increases will lead to widespread job loss.

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Rep. Phil Crane (R-IL), Congressional Record.

However Clinton wants to spin his tax plan, the bottom line is this: It will raise your taxes, increase the deficit, and kill over 1 million jobs.

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Rep. Joel Hefley (R-CO), Congressional Record.

I rise today to sound the alarm on a provision of the proposed reconciliation package that has ominous implications for New York City. The proposed reduction of the business-entertainment deductions contained in reconciliation could produce a job loss of at least 15,000 in the New York metropolitan area alone, and hundreds of thousands more job losses in business and tourist centers across America. The provision is, in effect, a new tax…If adopted, this provision would inflict deep wounds on New York City's second largest industry-tourism. Many experts fear that with the new tax, companies would drastically scale back use of meals and entertainment as part of doing business. That would directly affect restaurants, hotels, and theaters and trigger adverse ripple effects in industries like catering and conventions. New York is the premier arts and business center in the United States, so its economy depends heavily on business and entertainment. This reform would not only hurt the business community; it would also hurt the beleaguered arts community….The economic repercussions will be felt all across America: from New York City to Chicago to Las Vegas to Hawaii. As an export product, travel and tourism accounts for 11 percent of total U.S. exports of goods and services. Industry experts estimate that as much as $1 billion in new tax revenue will be raised from Manhattan alone. This is an ominous prospect. Worst of all, experts fear that this provision will be counterproductive as a revenue raiser, bringing minimal revenue benefit at great human cost.

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Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), Congressional Record.

Evidence