Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, also called the Deficit Reduction Act, modestly raised taxes and succeeded in wiping out the federal budget deficit for the first time in decades.

The bill added two higher taxes brackets: individual income tax rates of 36 percent and 39.6 (previously 31 percent had been the highest bracket). The bill included a 35 percent income tax rate for corporations and 4.3 cents per gallon increase in transportation fuels taxes.

Cry Wolf Quotes

He is smooth and he is slick and he is a great teleprompter performer, but regardless of how convincing the President may be, this bill is still tax-and-spend, pure and simple. It will not cut the deficit. It will not create jobs. And it will not cut spending. And no matter what you say, you are not going to be able to hide the tax increases in this bill from the American people come next April 15.

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Rep. Jim Bunning (R-KY), Congressional Record.

After careful analysis, I decided that I could not support this package. It goes too far in raising taxes and not far enough in cutting spending….I fear that this package, if enacted as passed by the House, will come back to haunt all of us because of its emphasis on taxes over spending cuts. We must not abandon the more fiscally responsible, new Democrat approach on which we were elected.

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Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), Congressional record.

As a result, even though the Clinton proposal contains a very steep increase in the nation's tax burden, the actual amount of money the government collects may fall if enough workers lose their jobs and the taxable incomes of individuals and businesses decline.

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The Heritage Foundation.

This plan will not work. If it was to work, then I'd have to become a Democrat and believe that more taxes and bigger government is the answer and it's not what the president ran on during the campaign. President Clinton is much different than candidate Clinton and that's the frustration.

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Rep. John Kasich (R-OH), CNN.

Evidence