Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, also called the Deficit Reduction Act, modestly raised taxes and succeeded in wiping out the federal budget deficit for the first time in decades.

The bill added two higher taxes brackets: individual income tax rates of 36 percent and 39.6 (previously 31 percent had been the highest bracket). The bill included a 35 percent income tax rate for corporations and 4.3 cents per gallon increase in transportation fuels taxes.

Cry Wolf Quotes

These new taxes will stifle economic growth, destroy jobs, reduce revenues, and increase the deficit. Economists across the ideological spectrum are convinced that the Clinton tax increases will lead to widespread job loss.

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Rep. Phil Crane (R-IL), Congressional Record.

This plan will not work. If it was to work, then I'd have to become a Democrat and believe that more taxes and bigger government is the answer and it's not what the president ran on during the campaign. President Clinton is much different than candidate Clinton and that's the frustration.

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Rep. John Kasich (R-OH), CNN.

The simple fact is the Clinton plan will not lower interest rates. It will not lower inflation. It will not create jobs. And it will not lower the deficit. The Clinton tax plan will spur inflation, lose jobs, increase the deficit, and hurt our economic growth. As most economists now agree, the Clinton plan must go.

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Rep. Wally Herger (R-CA), Congressional Record.

This budget calls for new taxes on gasoline and on Social Security, and yet President Clinton as a candidate condemned such taxes. Supporters say this budget reduces spending and will begin to get a handle on the national debt, yet even the President acknowledges that under this budget Federal spending will actually increase more than 20 percent over the next 5 years. And worse, the national debt will actually grow by $1 billion a day. But most importantly, this budget is a job killer-pure and simple.

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Bob Franks (R-NJ), Congressional Record

Evidence