Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, also called the Deficit Reduction Act, modestly raised taxes and succeeded in wiping out the federal budget deficit for the first time in decades.

The bill added two higher taxes brackets: individual income tax rates of 36 percent and 39.6 (previously 31 percent had been the highest bracket). The bill included a 35 percent income tax rate for corporations and 4.3 cents per gallon increase in transportation fuels taxes.

Cry Wolf Quotes

Day after day, tomorrow after tomorrow, in every purchase they make, every trip they take, in every school, in every church, in every workplace, in every home, in ways that they may not even be aware of, the Clinton energy tax will be a silent, greedy destroyer of their family budget. And they will remember who set loose this dreadful virus into the economic bloodstream of our Nation

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Rep. Robert Michel (R-IL), Congressional Record.

As a result, even though the Clinton proposal contains a very steep increase in the nation's tax burden, the actual amount of money the government collects may fall if enough workers lose their jobs and the taxable incomes of individuals and businesses decline.

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The Heritage Foundation.

The punitive taxes included in this budget will do nothing to stimulate the economy. Deficit reduction will come from reducing spending and tightening our belts much like private citizens must do. Government must stop living beyond its means and then raising taxes to justify the additional spending. As I write this, the Senate considers the plan. I can only hope the Members of the other body who support this largest tax increase in American history know in advance that they must explain to their constituents how taking more of their hard-earned money will help stop runaway budget deficits as spending continues to increase.

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James T. Walsh (R-NY), Congressional Record.

These new taxes will stifle economic growth, destroy jobs, reduce revenues, and increase the deficit. Economists across the ideological spectrum are convinced that the Clinton tax increases will lead to widespread job loss.

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Rep. Phil Crane (R-IL), Congressional Record.

Evidence