Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993

The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, also called the Deficit Reduction Act, modestly raised taxes and succeeded in wiping out the federal budget deficit for the first time in decades.

The bill added two higher taxes brackets: individual income tax rates of 36 percent and 39.6 (previously 31 percent had been the highest bracket). The bill included a 35 percent income tax rate for corporations and 4.3 cents per gallon increase in transportation fuels taxes.

Cry Wolf Quotes

This plan will not work. If it was to work, then I'd have to become a Democrat and believe that more taxes and bigger government is the answer and it's not what the president ran on during the campaign. President Clinton is much different than candidate Clinton and that's the frustration.

-
Rep. John Kasich (R-OH), CNN.

But, I will tell you, this program will not give you deficit reduction. It will be a disaster for the performance of the economy because of the repressive impact of these taxes and, of course, the possible inflationary impact of the taxes, along with the labor-cost-increasing mandates that are already a part of the president's agenda.

-
Rep. Dick Armey, CNN.

Clearly, this is a job-killer in the short-run. The revenues forecast for this budget will not materialize; the costs of this budget will be greater than what is forecast. The deficit will be worse, and it is not a good omen for the American economy. The impact on job creation is going to be devastating, and the American young people in particular will suffer a fairly substantial deferment of their lives because there simply won't be jobs for the next two to three years to go around to our young graduates across the country.

-
Rep. Dick Armey, CNN

I rise today to sound the alarm on a provision of the proposed reconciliation package that has ominous implications for New York City. The proposed reduction of the business-entertainment deductions contained in reconciliation could produce a job loss of at least 15,000 in the New York metropolitan area alone, and hundreds of thousands more job losses in business and tourist centers across America. The provision is, in effect, a new tax…If adopted, this provision would inflict deep wounds on New York City's second largest industry-tourism. Many experts fear that with the new tax, companies would drastically scale back use of meals and entertainment as part of doing business. That would directly affect restaurants, hotels, and theaters and trigger adverse ripple effects in industries like catering and conventions. New York is the premier arts and business center in the United States, so its economy depends heavily on business and entertainment. This reform would not only hurt the business community; it would also hurt the beleaguered arts community….The economic repercussions will be felt all across America: from New York City to Chicago to Las Vegas to Hawaii. As an export product, travel and tourism accounts for 11 percent of total U.S. exports of goods and services. Industry experts estimate that as much as $1 billion in new tax revenue will be raised from Manhattan alone. This is an ominous prospect. Worst of all, experts fear that this provision will be counterproductive as a revenue raiser, bringing minimal revenue benefit at great human cost.

-
Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), Congressional Record.

Evidence