Equal Pay Act

Equal Pay Act

The Equal Pay Act amended the Fair Labor Standards Act (1938) with the intent to end the disparity in wages between men and women. The amendment argued that sex discrimination depressed wages and living standards for employees, hindered full employment, caused labor disputes that in turn affected commerce, and violated free and fair competition. The crucial part of the amendment: “No employer having employees subject to any provisions of this section shall discriminate, within any establishment in which such employees are employed, between employees on the basis of sex by paying wages to employees in such establishment at a rate less than the rate at which he pays wages to employees of the opposite sex in such establishment for equal work on jobs[,] the performance of which requires equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions, except where such payment is made pursuant to (i) a seniority system; (ii) a merit system; (iii) a system which measures earnings by quantity or quality of production; or (iv) a differential based on any other factor other than sex…”

Commentary

US Capitol building

Darrel Issa’s Government Handover

January 05, 2011

Cry Wolf Quotes

There is little difference between men and women as regards their satisfactory performance in industry. Sound employment and personnel practices are applicable to both men and women are applicable to both men and women and no emphasis should be placed on any distinction between them as workers.

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Statement of the National Association of Manufacturers at the Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare (Subcommittee on Labor). Aug 1, 1962.
04/24/1962 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

I know that there are variables from plant to plant and business to business, and that if an attempt is made to regiment all industrial relations, individual businesses will suffer—their employees, especially women, can face unemployment—and the national economy will be weakened.

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Fred C. Edwards, General Manager of Industrial Relation for Armstrong Cork Company, Testimony, House Hearing.
03/26/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

You can’t really blame the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, for instance, for opposing the bill, chivalrous at heart as its members may be. For in addition to the possibility of added costs, there’s this problem: It’s a rare woman, we gather, who doesn’t think she is discriminated against on payday.

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From the Wall Street Journal editorial “Ladies Day in the Senate".
08/15/1962 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act

If my company were compelled to raise all of our female rates in this plant to the male rates in question, it would seriously jeopardize the competitive position of this plant with its competitors located in other states employing all females in these jobs.

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Jerry N. Markham, director of industrial relations, Thatcher Glass Manufacturing Company, Testimony, House Hearing.
03/27/1963 | Full Details | Law(s): Equal Pay Act