Clean Air Quotes

Laws dealing with complex and technical problems were passed with much emotionalism, little debate, and even less of a data base for support.

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Gary D. Knight, Associate Director for Environment, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Chamber of Commerce Public Presentations

Because of our guilt—and because of the media’s espousement (sic) of the movement—laws were passed which asked industry and the American consumer for the impossible. The members [of Congress] admitted they did not know what could actually be done to clean up our environment, how long it would take or how much it would cost. But they went ahead anyway in the spirit of political expediency to ramrod through measures that would affect millions of people and billions of dollars…

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Gary D. Knight, Associate Director for Environment, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Chamber of Commerce Public Presentations

In summary, epidemiologic evidence supports the position that airborne lead in the concentrations found in the general ambient atmosphere is, at most, a minor contributor to lead in blood. The increment of quantity of the airborne lead contribution even if it can be deduced, is biologically meaningless.

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Dr Jerome F. Cole, director of environmental health for the Lead Industries Association. The Los Angeles Times.
323611/09/1975 | Full Details | Law(s): Phase Out of Leaded Gasoline

It would cost us more to produce high octane, unleaded fuel; it would cost the consumer more to buy it; and it would cost the country more in terms of its overall consumption of crude oil.

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Leo McReynolds, research director for Phillips. The Los Angeles Times.
323512/30/1974 | Full Details | Law(s): Phase Out of Leaded Gasoline

Clean air, land and water are vital to all of us. But so are jobs, food, clothing and housing. We have to weigh the total impact on the environment along with the economic and social costs in order to clean up.

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Chamber of Commerce Executive Vice President Arch Booth, Chamber of Commerce Newsletter, May 1973.

[I]f GM is forced to introduce catalytic converter systems across-the-board on 1975 models . . . [i]t is conceivable that complete stoppage of the entire production (system) could occur, with the obvious tremendous loss to the company, shareholders, employees, suppliers and communities.

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From the 1972 Congressional testimony of General Motors vice president Earnest Starkman. SPOT: THE BIG THREE’S ATTACK ON THE GLOBAL WARMING TREATY, The Environmental Working Group
349203/17/1973 | Full Details | Law(s): Clean Air Act of 1970

The people in this room have the same amount of lead in their blood as do the natives in New Guinea. If you take lead out of the air, you’ll still have it in your body.

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George Rausch, a professor from Tulane University, The Los Angeles Times.
323410/28/1971 | Full Details | Law(s): Phase Out of Leaded Gasoline

You could wake up with egg on your face if you force a double cost on the consumer.

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Malcolm McDuffle, president of Mohawk Petroleum. The Los Angeles Times.
323311/25/1970 | Full Details | Law(s): Phase Out of Leaded Gasoline

There is no evidence that lead in the atmosphere, from autos or any other source, poses a health hazard.

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John L. Kimberley, executive director of the Lead Industries Association, Testimony, New York City Council’s Committee on Environmental Protection. The New York Times.
323209/25/1970 | Full Details | Law(s): Phase Out of Leaded Gasoline

[It would not be possible] to achieve the control levels specified in the bill . . .[M]anufacturers . . . would be forced to shut down.

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American Automobile Manufacturers Association, Testimony, Senate Subcommittee on Air and Water Pollution.
349101/01/1970 | Full Details | Law(s): Clean Air Act of 1970

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