Industry groups Quotes

In Utica no one ever bothers the factories about these things. Why are we bothered this way? No, we do not keep the names and addresses of our homeworkers. Women wanting such work come in and get it and that’s all there is about it.

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The manager of a felt shoe factory
400301/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

The hardship entailed on a certain proportion of the home workers, without means of support, the distress they will suffer, their loss will be greater than the benefit coming to the public through the elimination of that work.

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Max Adler, owner of a garment factory. Only date available: 1913.
400201/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

If you pass this bill, it will not be ten years certainly; I believe it will not be five years until practically every cellar bakery in New York city will be out of business.

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Frank P. Hill, representative of the New York Retail Bakers’ Association. Only date available: 1913.
400701/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

If in the candy business, people engaged in this line in other states who come to New York for their product are unable to receive it, they will take their trade away from the State of New York and give it to other states where this work can be produced in greater volume possibly at a reduced price.

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Alfred J. Talley of the Confectioners Association for the State of New York. Only date available: 1913.
401001/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

I wonder do the American people ever stop to realize that these social uplifters are one of the chief causes of the high cost of living. If they had their way a can of tomatoes instead of costing 12 cents would cost at least 50 cents. This is the inevitable result of their endeavors.

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Director of the largest canning company in the state responds to minimum wage and Factory Investigating Commission efforts in general. Only date available: 1913.
401301/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

I have seen children working in factories, and I have seen them working at home and they were perfectly happy.

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Mabel A. Clark, of the W.N. Clark Company. Superintendent, vice president, and stockholder. Only date available: 1913.
401601/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

Such [sanitary] certificates will give a possible opportunity for an unfair person to make demands for graft on the small baker, who is always reluctant to go into the courts to force recognition of his rights. We believe either or both of these sections would have the effect of gradually reducing rather than increasing the number of small bakeries.

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J.C. Bogart, New York Flour Club (they represented over 80 percent of firms in the flour business). Only date available: 1913.
400501/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

[This package of bills is] superfluous and entirely unnecessary and is a menace to our business.

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Charles E. Abbott, representing the Wholesale Bakers’ Association. Only date available: 1913.
400901/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

There really is a close competition between the canned good industry of this state and that of other states, and that while the canners of other states are operating under general exemptions from the labor law provisions, it will produce a harsh, if not destructive, competition to compel the New York canner to attempt to operate under strict regulation as to the hours of employment.

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“Conditions in Canneries”, Memorandum of the New York State Canners’ Association. By John. F. Connor, attorney for the canners’ association. Only date available: 1913.
401201/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

This is not a charitable business.

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A factory owner, unnamed. Only date available: 1913.
401501/01/1913 | Full Details | Law(s): Triangle Factory Laws

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