Ergonomics Standard (2000)

Ergonomics Standard (2000)

The ergonomics standard issued by OSHA in 2000 would have required hazard information and reporting, training, and worker participation programs, among other elements. It would have covered more than 6 million employers and 102 million workers. OSHA estimated the standard would have prevented at least 4.6 million ergonomics-related injuries (musculoskeletal injuries are responsible for one-third of reported work-related injuries and illnesses). The standard was repealed in 2001 by George W. Bush and the Republican Congress.

Cry Wolf Quotes

This regulation, whenever it is issued and takes effect, will be one of the most far-reaching workplace rules ever issued by any federal agency. Ultimately it will affect every business in the country.

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Sen. Christopher S. Bond (R-Mo.), chairman of the Senate's Small Business Committee. The Los Angeles Times.

You're creating an enormously expensive regulation without true evidence of what we will get out of it. You're creating an enormous cost that will only have the effect of pushing jobs offshore.

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Rep. Anne M. Northup (KY-R), The New York Times.

[The ergonomics standard is] the most expensive, intrusive regulations ever promulgated, certainly by the Department of Labor and maybe by any department in history.

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Sen. Don Nickles (R-Okla.) assistant majority leader. The Los Angeles Times.

These [ergonomics] regulations would cost employers, large and small, billions of dollars annually while providing uncertain benefits.

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White House budget office, under the Bush administration. Wall Street Journal.